School Development Plan

Beech Green School Development Plan
Introduction

The School Development Plan (SDP) is produced at the beginning of Term 2, in late October or early November. It’s a working document, very much the subject of modification and review, which aims to focus and give direction to the work of the school over the next academic year. 

Content

The SDP is organised into four areas, which are directly linked to the latest OFSTED framework and our school’s Self Evaluation Form (SEF)

1. Leadership and Management
2. Personal Development, Behaviour and Welfare
3. Quality of Teaching, Learning and Assessment
4. Outcomes for Pupils

All members of the school community have been consulted on the key priorities to be included in the SDP, through discussions during inclusive meetings involving staff and governors, including parent governors.

Monitoring

The monitoring of progress to achieve our objectives in each key priority is ongoing.  However, there are two scheduled reviews; one in January and one in July, the results of which are shared with governors and staff.

Please contact the school office if you would like a copy of the complete School Development Plan but here below is a brief summary of each key priority.


Summary of Key Priorities for the 2016 to 2017/18 School Development Plan

Each key priority will have an action plan which is directly linked to an area for development, identified in the “Self Evaluation Summary” document.  However, all intended outcomes are interlinked.

1. Leadership and Management

The main focus for the Leadership of the school is to ensure that the outcomes for children show a steady improvement in 2017 and 2018.

a) To continue to engage and inform parents more fully of their child’s learning and the life of the school.

2. Personal Development, Behaviour and Welfare

a) To research, discuss, agree and implement strategies to help improve the behaviour of the small minority of children who regularly exhibit challenging and disruptive behaviour in school.

3. Quality of Teaching, Learning and Assessment

a) To support staff in the teaching of Handwriting and Spelling in order to raise standards in English across the school and enable more children to meet at least Age Related Expectations.

b) To continue to embed the new assessment procedures across Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2.

c) To ensure that teaching staff are sufficiently well informed to make accurate judgements about the standard of children’s work based on the current expectations, in order to identify appropriate interventions and accelerate children’s progress. 

d) To research and adopt a whole school “Mastery” approach to raising teaching and learning standards in Mathematics.

4. Outcomes for Pupils

To maintain the relatively strong results in certain areas such as EYFS, PSC, GPS and KS2 Reading but to address the areas of weakness identified in our current Inspection Dashboard.

Progress from EYFS to KS1

a) Improve the KS1 progress scores for Reading so they are no longer judged to be below the national figure for expected + (E+) or greater depth (GD) for the EYFS group: expected (E+).

b) Improve the KS1 progress scores for Writing so they are no longer judged to be below the national figure for expected+ (E+) or greater depth (GD) for the EYFS groups: emerging (E+), expected (E=, GD), exceeding (GD).

c) Improve the KS1 progress scores for Mathematics so they are no longer judged to be well below the national figure for expected+ (E+) or greater depth (GD) for the EYFS groups: emerging (E+) and expected (GD).

Attainment at KS1

a) Improve the KS1 attainment scores in Reading, particularly for boys and disadvantaged groups.

d) Improve the KS1 attainment scores in Writing, particularly for boys and disadvantaged groups.

Progress from KS1 to KS2

a) Improve the KS2 progress scores in Writing, particularly for the boys, disadvantaged, low and middle prior attainment groups, so they are no longer judged as being significantly below average and ranked in the bottom 15% of schools.

e) Improve the KS2 progress scores in Mathematics, particularly for the disadvantaged, middle and high prior attaining groups, so they are no longer judged as being significantly below average and ranked in the bottom 15% of schools.